Customizing Deployments

Custom Deployment Actions

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squashlabs, April 15, 2019

You can define custom actions in the Squash YAML file. These are custom commands that will be executed inside your application’s container. When you define a custom action it will appear in the Deployment settings page, as a new item within the “Actions” dropdown. This is an easy way to quickly run routine/common tasks inside

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Host OS & installed packages

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squashlabs, April 13, 2019

Host OS and installed packages The host virtual machine where we deploy your Docker containers comes with an absolute minimum list of handy tools. These are not meant to be extensive since you can fully customize the environment within a Docker container to fit your needs. Host environment details: Operating System: Amazon Linux 2 (CentOS

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Signing up with GitLab

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squashlabs, April 13, 2019

Squash only requests the absolutely minimum set of permissions on GitLab. We support both GitLab Cloud and GitLab Self-hosted. GitLab Self-Hosted Setup Please follow the steps on this page for GitLab Self-Hosted. GitLab Cloud When you signup you will be prompted to the following screens: Oauth This is the standard GitLab authorization page requesting your

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Using Assets in the YAML file

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squashlabs, April 12, 2019

When the Assets Storage is enabled Squash will automatically add a new /assets/ mount point for all deployments within the repository. Using the copy_files_build_process feature in the YAML file Here you would manually copy files or folders within the build process defined in the .squash.yml file. This will essentially transfer data from the assets folder to a different location within

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Customizing PR Comments

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squashlabs, April 12, 2019

You can customize a Squash PR comment to list different applications, subdomains and URL arguments. Listing Multiple Applications See this page for more details on repos with multiple applications. Listing Subdomains Squash has built-in support for subdomains and  multi-level subdomains. Here is a .squash.yml example (refer to this page for more information on the Squash

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Subdomain port mapping

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squashlabs, April 12, 2019

For reference, here is how Squash handles subdomains and multi-level subdomains. Subdomain port mapping is a great way to define HTTP endpoints for microservices to facilitate the communication between apps and APIs. This feature works for Dockerfiles, docker-compose and any apps without Docker. Example using Docker For this example we will use a repository with

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VM Sizes

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squashlabs, April 12, 2019

Available VM sizes Click here for a complete list of the available VM types, including memory, storage and CPU. Changing VM sizes You can configure the right amount of memory, vCPU and storage to tailor your needs. Every application is different and Squash gives you flexibility to change these settings in multiple levels. Account Level

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Account & Permissions

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squashlabs, April 2, 2019

Squash offers three types of user accounts: Admin Technical Admin Member Admin Role This is the default role for the first user in a personal or organization account. Admins have full access to the account, including billing. Technical Admin This role has the same access as Admin, except billing. Member Members have access to the

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Updating the Deployment Cache

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squashlabs, March 28, 2019

This API call will start a new deployment to force a Deployment Cache (DC) update. Squash will update the cache during the shutdown process of the deployment. This is useful for relatively large applications using dynamic data in Dockerfiles, such as database dumps and other assets that need to be updated on a regular basis.

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Updating Assets

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squashlabs, March 28, 2019

After submitting API calls it may take from 1 to 3 minutes for the changes to be fully propagated. This depends on the number and size of the files updated within the assets folder. Upload file https://api.squash.io/a/uploads/?repository=<repository_name> HTTP Method: POST Success Response Code: 200 Success Response Body: JSON data Sample Request curl –request POST \

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Authentication

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squashlabs, March 28, 2019

Squash offers a REST API to interact with the service. The response body is in JSON format. Authentication is key based only. API Keys You can create API keys to access the service by going to the General Settings page. Using the API Key Squash expects a Squash-Key header on each API request. Here is an example on how

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Assets

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squashlabs, March 24, 2019

When the Assets Storage is enabled Squash will automatically add a new /assets/ mount point for all deployments within the repository. You can upload up to 100GB of data in this folder (additional charges apply, check out the pricing page). How to enable the Assets Storage Step 1 Go to the Squash Admin page and then click on Settings -> Repositories

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Squash HTTP Headers

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squashlabs, March 24, 2019

Squash provides custom HTTP headers that are always send to the applications running within Squash deployments. These headers provide users with more flexibility at the web server level. Squash-Server This header always have the value true and is used to signal to applications that the request is coming from Squash. This is handy if you need to

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Environment Variables

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squashlabs, March 24, 2019

Custom Environment Variables You can define custom environment variables from the Squash admin interface. Go to Settings -> Repositories and then click on “Settings” for a given repository. Each environment variable defined on this page will become available within the deployment host and docker containers.   Using environment variables defined in the web interface within the

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The Squash YAML file

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squashlabs, March 24, 2019

You can define a .squash.yml at the root level of your repository. This file provides greater flexibility to control the build and execution of each deployment. Squash works out of the box without the need of a .squash.yml file. In this case Squash searches for a Dockerfile or docker-compose.yml file within the root path of your application code. More detail on

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