How to Merge Objects in TypeScript

Avatar

By squashlabs, Last Updated: May 8, 2024

How to Merge Objects in TypeScript

In TypeScript, merging objects refers to combining the properties of two or more objects into a single object. This can be useful in various scenarios, such as combining configurations, merging data from multiple sources, or creating a new object with updated properties.

There are several techniques available in TypeScript to merge objects, each with its specific use cases and advantages. In this tutorial, we will explore these techniques and learn how to merge objects effectively in TypeScript.

Techniques for Merging Objects in TypeScript

TypeScript provides several techniques for merging objects, including merging two objects, merging properties of objects, object spreading, using Object.assign, merging objects with same keys, merging objects with different keys, and merging nested objects. Let’s dive deeper into each of these techniques and understand how they work.

Related Article: How to Run Typescript Ts-Node in Databases

Merging Two Objects in TypeScript

Merging two objects in TypeScript involves combining the properties of two objects into a new object. This can be achieved using the spread operator (...) or the Object.assign method.

Here’s an example of merging two objects using the spread operator:

const obj1 = { foo: 1, bar: 2 };
const obj2 = { baz: 3 };

const merged = { ...obj1, ...obj2 };

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: 1, bar: 2, baz: 3 }

In this example, the spread operator is used to merge the properties of obj1 and obj2 into the merged object.

Alternatively, you can use the Object.assign method to achieve the same result:

const obj1 = { foo: 1, bar: 2 };
const obj2 = { baz: 3 };

const merged = Object.assign({}, obj1, obj2);

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: 1, bar: 2, baz: 3 }

Both approaches result in a new object that contains the properties from both obj1 and obj2.

Merging Properties of Objects in TypeScript

Merging properties of objects in TypeScript involves updating or adding properties to an existing object. This can be achieved using the spread operator or the Object.assign method.

Here’s an example of merging properties of objects using the spread operator:

const obj1 = { foo: 1, bar: 2 };
const obj2 = { bar: 3, baz: 4 };

const merged = { ...obj1, ...obj2 };

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: 1, bar: 3, baz: 4 }

In this example, the bar property of obj1 is overwritten with the bar property of obj2 in the resulting merged object.

Alternatively, you can use the Object.assign method to achieve the same result:

const obj1 = { foo: 1, bar: 2 };
const obj2 = { bar: 3, baz: 4 };

const merged = Object.assign({}, obj1, obj2);

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: 1, bar: 3, baz: 4 }

Both approaches result in a new object that contains the merged properties from obj1 and obj2.

Object Spreading in TypeScript

Object spreading in TypeScript refers to spreading the properties of an object into another object or function call. This is achieved using the spread operator.

Here’s an example of object spreading in TypeScript:

const obj1 = { foo: 1, bar: 2 };
const obj2 = { ...obj1, baz: 3 };

console.log(obj2); // Output: { foo: 1, bar: 2, baz: 3 }

In this example, the properties of obj1 are spread into the object literal for obj2, resulting in a new object that contains the properties from both objects.

Object spreading can also be used with function calls:

const obj = { foo: 1, bar: 2 };

function someFunction({ foo, bar }: { foo: number, bar: number }) {
  console.log(foo, bar);
}

someFunction({ ...obj }); // Output: 1, 2

In this example, the properties of obj are spread into the argument for the someFunction call, allowing the function to receive the properties as separate arguments.

Related Article: How to Implement and Use Generics in Typescript

Using Object Assign to Merge Objects in TypeScript

The Object.assign method in TypeScript can be used to merge objects by copying the values of all enumerable properties from one or more source objects to a target object.

Here’s an example of using Object.assign to merge objects in TypeScript:

const obj1 = { foo: 1 };
const obj2 = { bar: 2 };
const obj3 = { baz: 3 };

const merged = Object.assign({}, obj1, obj2, obj3);

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: 1, bar: 2, baz: 3 }

In this example, the Object.assign method is used to merge the properties of obj1, obj2, and obj3 into the merged object.

Merging Objects with Same Keys in TypeScript

When merging objects in TypeScript that have the same keys, the resulting object will have the values of the last object with the same key.

Here’s an example of merging objects with the same keys in TypeScript:

const obj1 = { foo: 1, bar: 2 };
const obj2 = { bar: 3, baz: 4 };

const merged = { ...obj1, ...obj2 };

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: 1, bar: 3, baz: 4 }

In this example, the bar property of obj1 is overwritten with the bar property of obj2 in the resulting merged object.

Merging Objects with Different Keys in TypeScript

When merging objects in TypeScript that have different keys, the resulting object will contain the properties from both objects.

Here’s an example of merging objects with different keys in TypeScript:

const obj1 = { foo: 1, bar: 2 };
const obj2 = { baz: 3 };

const merged = { ...obj1, ...obj2 };

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: 1, bar: 2, baz: 3 }

In this example, the resulting merged object contains the properties from both obj1 and obj2.

Related Article: Tutorial on Typescript ts-ignore

Merging Nested Objects in TypeScript

Merging nested objects in TypeScript involves merging the properties of objects that are nested within other objects. This can be achieved using the spread operator or the Object.assign method.

Here’s an example of merging nested objects using the spread operator:

const obj1 = { foo: { bar: 1 } };
const obj2 = { foo: { baz: 2 } };

const merged = { ...obj1, ...obj2 };

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: { baz: 2 } }

In this example, the foo property of obj1 is overwritten with the foo property of obj2 in the resulting merged object.

Alternatively, you can use the Object.assign method to achieve the same result:

const obj1 = { foo: { bar: 1 } };
const obj2 = { foo: { baz: 2 } };

const merged = Object.assign({}, obj1, obj2);

console.log(merged); // Output: { foo: { baz: 2 } }

Both approaches result in a new object that contains the merged properties of the nested objects.

Limitations and Caveats of Merging Objects in TypeScript

When merging objects in TypeScript, it’s important to consider the limitations and caveats associated with each technique. Here are some common limitations and caveats to keep in mind:

– Merging objects with circular references can lead to infinite recursion and cause a stack overflow error.
– Merging objects with non-enumerable properties using Object.assign will not include those properties in the resulting merged object.
– Merging nested objects can result in unexpected behavior if the objects have conflicting properties with the same keys.

It’s important to thoroughly test and understand the implications of merging objects in TypeScript to avoid unexpected issues in your code.

External Sources

TypeScript Documentation – Merging Objects
MDN Web Docs – Object.assign()
MDN Web Docs – Spread Syntax

You May Also Like

How to Run Typescript Ts-Node in Databases

Running Typescript Ts-Node in databases can be a powerful tool for handling data in your applications. This tutorial provides a comprehensive guide on how to set up your... read more

How to Implement and Use Generics in Typescript

Generics in TypeScript provide a powerful way to write reusable and type-safe code. This tutorial will guide you through the syntax, concepts, and practical use cases of... read more

Tutorial on Typescript ts-ignore

TypeScript ts-ignore is a powerful tool that allows developers to ignore TypeScript errors within a JavaScript environment. This tutorial provides a comprehensive guide... read more

How to Convert a String to a Number in TypeScript

Converting a TypeScript string to a number can be done using various methods. By using the Number(), parseInt(), parseFloat(), unary plus operator, or the parseInt()... read more

How to Use the Record Type in TypeScript

A basic guide on using the Record type in TypeScript, and its application. Chapters include Basic Usage, Readonly Record, Advanced Usage, and Best... read more

Handling Types with TypeScript-eslint/ban-types

Handling Types with TypeScript-eslint/ban-types: Managing types in TypeScript can be a challenge, but with the help of TypeScript-eslint/ban-types, it becomes much... read more